WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE

TIMELINE

suf·frage

   /ˈsəfrij/

noun

      the right to vote in political elections.

1812

1848

1849

Esther McQuigg Morris is born in Spencer, NY. She later lived in Owego, NY, before moving to Wyoming and becoming a driving force in lobbying for Woman Suffrage to be granted in the state Constitution. She was also the first female Justice of the Peace in the U.S.

Seneca Falls is the location for the 1st Women’s Rights Convention, launching the Woman Suffrage Movement in the U.S. 

The 1st state constitution in California extends property rights to women.

1861-1865

1853

1851

 During the Civil War, efforts for the suffrage movement came to a halt as women put their energies toward the war.

Women delegates are denied the right to speak at The World’s Temperance Convention in New York City.

The 2nd Women’s Rights Convention is held in Worcester, MA.

1863

1866

LOCAL Belva Lockwood purchases 249 Front Street in Owego and becomes the owner, principal and teacher of the Owego Female Seminary

 The American Equal Rights Association is formed and is an organization dedicated to the goal of Suffrage regardless of gender or race.

1868

 The American Equal Rights Association is formed and is an organization dedicated to the goal of Suffrage regardless of gender or race.

1869

The National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) is formed. It is a more radical institution to achieve the vote through a constitutional amendment as well as push other woman’s rights issues.

1869

1869

 The American Equal Rights Association is formed and is an organization dedicated to the goal of Suffrage regardless of gender or race.

Elizabeth Chatfield, an Owego resident, becomes the private secretary for Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton at The Revolution, the first official Suffrage newspaper in the U.S. 

1872

 Susan B. Anthony and 15 other women were arrested for illegally voting.

1872

Victoria Woodhull ran for President. However, she was younger than the mandated age of 35, so it was an unofficial run.

1887

1884

1878

The 1st vote on Woman Suffrage is taken in the Senate and is defeated.

 Belva Lockwood becomes the first woman officially on a U.S. Presidential ballot.

A woman suffrage amendment is proposed in the U.S. Congress. When the 19th Amendment passes 41 years later, it is worded exactly the same as the 1878 amendment.

1888

1888

1890

Belva Lockwood becomes the only woman who has run twice for the President of the U.S.

The National Council of Women in the U.S. is established to promote the advancement of women in society. 

Wyoming is admitted into the Union, and the state constitution grants Woman Suffrage.

1894

1894

1893

Susan B. Anthony speaks at the County Convention in support of Woman Suffrage at the Tioga County Courthouse in Owego, NY. 

600,000 signatures are presented to the New York State Constitutional Convention in a failed effort to bring woman suffrage amendment to the voters.

Colorado adopts Woman Suffrage.

1896

1896

1896

The National Association of Colored Women’s Club is founded.

Utah joins the Union with full Suffrage for women.

Idaho adopts Woman Suffrage.

1912

1911

1910

Woman Suffrage is supported for the first time at the National level by Theodore Roosevelt’s Bull Moose Party.

The elaborate California suffrage campaign succeeds by a narrow margin.

Washington State adopts Woman Suffrage.

1912

Oregon, Kansas, and Arizona adopt Woman Suffrage.

1914

Nevada and Montana adopt Woman Suffrage.

1915

Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts continue to reject Woman Suffrage.

1917

1917

1916

Arkansas women are allowed to vote in primary elections.

New York adopts Woman Suffrage.

Jeanette Ranken of Montana is the first woman elected to the House of Representatives.

1918

1918

1918

Michigan, South Dakota, Oklahoma adopt Woman Suffrage

President Woodrow Wilson addresses the Senate about adopting woman suffrage at the end of World War I.

94 women vote for the first time at the Central Fire Station on North Avenue, Owego, NY. 

1919

The Senate passes the 19th Amendment, and the ratification process begins.

August 26

1920

Three-quarters of the state legislature ratified the 19th Amendment. American women win full voting rights!

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